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Thread: another sword ID thread

  1. #1
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    another sword ID thread

    Hello all,

    I've had this sword for many years now and just dug it out of storage (while looking for something else). I got it cheap, meant to research it but soon forgot about it. The inscription is an odd font and it appears to say "M. Feltez. Grimbo" The last letter in the Felte could be an "r" a "z" or maybe an "x." The grip is crude slab rivited on a shamshir style hilt. The cross guard is also crude with a forged birds head or animal head of some sort.

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    Any thoughts or ideas are welcomed!

    Best regards,
    Chris Covington

  2. #2
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    My impression is Mexican/Spanish colonial.

  3. #3
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    Looks like a spanish naval boarding sabre I saw once in a book of mine. The cross guard has those holes and rings for fixing the sword inside the ship.
    Feltez does sound spanish but is not a typical surname in my country
    Grimbo I cannot say

    I don't think I have been very useful, sorry.

    Santiago.

  4. #4
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    It's bordering on folk art, and it's not in my early medieval venue, but I find it somewhat charming. If I ever take up "a creative career in piracy" it would make a nice sidearm, suitable for swashbuckling.
    Retired civil servant, part time blacksmith, seasonal Viking ship captain.

  5. #5
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    Hey guys thanks for the heads up. I started to look into Mexican swords and sabers and it does seem to have many of the characteristics of local Mexican swordsmiths. Since it was purchased in Baltimore, Maryland I always assumed it was made by a local Eastcoast smith. Now Mexico seem much more likely. How cool At this point I will call it a Mexican saber until I get better clarification. And Bruce I agree it does have some charm to it. I think that is why I never bothered to sell it (and it has been in storage for a long while).

    Thanks for your help!
    Chris Covington

  6. #6
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    Quite a nice sword in its simplicity and form. Looks like a type of espada ancha--these were used from the colonial period right through the Mexican Revolution. I have seen some like yours referred to as Mexican swords used during the conflict with the French--the snake formed quillon was a favorite and sometimes had a leather strap from the quillon to pommel as a knuckle-guard.
    Tom Donoho

  7. #7
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    I saw this thread and recognized the name on the sword as being on one of mine. in many ways it is a typical late form of Mexican rivited hilt saber but the blade is fairly thin. There are remains of a lining around the front of the handle and the patina has been aggressively scrubbed. Name:  01.jpg
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Size:  86.3 KB There is a serpent head on one of the branches that resemble one on Christopher's sword
    Last edited by Don L W; 11-13-2016 at 07:54 AM.

  8. #8
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    Both very interesting. The top sword in the San Louis Potosi style (1790? to 1830?) with the early blade with up turned foible, most often dated 1740 to 1780, however; if it is correct this style is a direct descendent of the mid 18th century Spanish dragoon saber then it should be amended to 1750 or later. The next sword a very typical Round Tang very popular in the first half of 19th century. I have never seen a San Louis Potosi style hilt on the earlier style blade. Most or rather all I have seen utilize the laminated grip with single sash langet. The style used in 1909 Mexico being very different than either one of these swords. Perhaps an early collector marking his trophies.Spanish colonial and Early Mexican swords are almost impossible to date and all dates are a best guess. Swords overlap eras and were used many generations and older swords with later hilts and vice versa. Regards Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  9. #9
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    Here are some pics showing the similar serpent head, I am leaning toward early twentieth century folk art/weapon for these. With swords the border between a sword that is made to be used and one that is made to be kept or hung on a wall can be a bit blurry especially when factoring in the violence of the times, the ability of the common man to procure arms and cultural attitudes toward cold steel weapons as well as the pride in work and abilities of the craftsman. I think my sword would not be much use in a proper fight but Christopher's might do better.

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  10. #10
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    Thanks for the posts gentlemen,

    Its good so see another sword with the same signature. The 1909 date also helps out a lot. I wonder if Mr. Grimbo was a swordmaker or at least dealer who provided edged weapons in preparation for the 1910 Mexican Revolution? Since neither weapon is a military pattern maybe they were made for the revolutionaries like Emiliano Zapata or Pancho Villa?

    Cheers,

  11. #11
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    Even if copies of older styles surely not folk art. Mexico was still at war with it self and us in this era. This is the time frame of the first use of the patton sword. The early black smith made espada anchas are hack and slash not elegant weapons by any strech. The beast head common to most of these swords expecially the San Louis Potosi style. But with these type swords anything is possible. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  12. #12
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    Hi Eric,

    Forgive my ignorance; what is the San Louis Potosi style?

    Thanks,
    Chris

  13. #13
    Does it have an edge?

  14. #14
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    Hi Marius,

    Yes mine has an edge. Not the sharpest sword I've seen but it could do its job.

    Best regards,
    Chris

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Ron Covington View Post
    Hi Marius,

    Yes mine has an edge. Not the sharpest sword I've seen but it could do its job.

    Best regards,
    Chris
    Hello Chris,

    Judging by the shape of the blade, I would say it is a boarding sword. However, the hilt is rather unusual for those swords.

    In conclusion... no conclusion.

    I'm curious to see what other suggestions you will get.

    Marius

  16. #16
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    San Louis Potosi


    Laminated Sash Langet


    Round Tang
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  17. #17
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    Eric,

    Excellent selection of swords! Thank you for sharing the photos. Now it is much more clear. Has there been sny decent books on these types of swords?

    Chris

  18. #18
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    Christopher, There are some references in books as in Petersons Arms and armor in Colonial America. The best info I have found is in the various articles written on the espada ancha. Google, espada ancha PDF. Your SLP hilt sword is not the norm. The blade is a much earlier form than the hilt. Most San Louis Potosi hilt swords are straighter and pre date machete types after 1850 or 60. Most I have seen would range 1800 to 1850. Once again I collect swords, I am not a scholar as some on here are. I welcome corrections on any dates or narrowing down. These swords have not been studied in depth. I have pieced together what little I have from many sources including this forum. I find new and better info all the time. Search this forum for espada ancha. Regards Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  19. #19
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    There is another one on an auction site from the 1880-1890 time frame. Both Don's and the auction sword have the large thimble pommel and both grips and pommels look later then the guards. Most round tangs have small thimble pommels similar to black smith made Caribbean cup hilts. I suspect both are made from older and newer parts. There are three different types of these round tangs. The older type with blacksmith flat blade and forward separate quillions and most have the lesser upturned foible the later flat blade. The next style with blacksmith made or cutler made calvery type fullered blade. Many similar to m1860 in width and design. The third type round tangs utilize the stirrup or reverse "P" guards and have the lesser upturn later flat blade or the machete type blades.Very interesting turn of the century swords but I do not have a clue who, what, why even though both being dated we know when. Perhaps a type of presentation sword for rebel forces? Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  20. #20
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    Hi Eric,

    Is it signed Grimbo like mine and Don's swords? Do you have a link of photos you can PM me? I'm not in the market for any swords but would love to see it.

    Cheers,
    Chris

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