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Thread: Imperial German Artillery Officer Swords

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kansas City Metro (USA)
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    Imperial German Artillery Officer Swords

    Gents,

    I picked up two large (Grosser) size Imperial German Artillery Officer swords over the weekend at a local militaria show. Both supposedly came from the same source as a pair of WWII bring-backs.

    The first sword is a WK&C with a pipe back etched blade. The bright blade incorporates "Eisenhauer" (Iron Cutter) in the obverse etching motif along with the expected military motifs and stands of arms. The brass P guard hilt has crossed cannons on the front langet and an early jawless lion head pommel. The grips are sharkskin wrapped with twisted wire. The iron scabbard is nickel plated with two brass suspension bands and rings. It is uncleaned, unaltered, and un-messed with.
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    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kansas City Metro (USA)
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    1,739
    The second sword is also a WK&C with a pipe back fire gilt and blue blade. The bright steel blade incorporates "Stahlhauer" (Steel Cutter) in the gilt etching on the obverse. The spine of the blade is etched with the retailer "F. Noe & Schulze, Coblenz" in the gilt area. The brass P guard hilt has crossed cannons on the obverse langet and a full lion head pommel with red stone eyes. The end of the guard has another fully realized lion head motif as well. The langets, guard, and backstrap are all extensively pierced with heavy ornamentation. The bottom of the guard is stamped "GeschGeschutz / Muster" as a proprietary design. The iron scabbard is nickel plated and has two brass suspension bands. The lower ring has been removed in order to update the sword after circa 1910 to the new single strap suspension system. The scabbard also shows the remains of black paint that once covered the nickel to update the sword to new scabbard regulations.

    This outstanding deluxe sword shows its evolution from an early Artillery Officer sword to a sword that continued to be worn after a regulation change.
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    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    336
    Very nice, congratulations!
    Non soli cedit!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Birmingham Alabama
    Posts
    1,675

    Lightbulb The real Artillery Pattern

    Nice sabers, but they are the extra purchase models. They simply used the Cavalry pattern and added the crossed cannons. The actual Ordnanz model has square langets and that peculiar tip to the blade. Not many Arty Officers would want one like that, it seems they preferred the Cavalry style over the regulation model.

    This example is a Kammerstueck, with the proofs and dated cypher on the blade.

    Dale
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