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Thread: 1910 Officers cavalry sword "Special"

  1. #76
    Hi Gordon,

    There was a thread on the forum started by Richard D Wales (Experimental German Cavalry Sabre) in August 2016 which has a drawing and photographs of German grips and blades, circa 1880, complete with finger loop. Very similar to those adopted for the 7th Hussars 'Special' Grips in question.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,704
    Beville sword showing location of grip wire anchor location. In the 8th groove counting from the guard the round wooden peg retaining the grip wire is seen. It is placed on top where the indentation for the wire ceases to create the thumb indent. The grip wire on this sword never covered the thumb indent.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Surrey, England.
    Posts
    13,990
    In my opinion German grip refers to the leather finger loop, thumb placer and swollen end - this was absolutely typical of mensur schlager grips and I have a German officer's sword dating to before 1883 which emulates it.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Stratford upon Avon UK
    Posts
    428
    Just noticed that MDL has recently put up the J.F.Laycock example.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    3,704
    The Laycock sword is very interesting in itself and I see the scabbard drag is equal length on each side. I have an 1855 Wilkinson CG sword with the same treatment to the drag.
    I mention this because most drags have one arm longer than the other.

  6. #81
    This thread was initially started by Will in 2017 with respect to a special pattern sword he had recently acquired. To summarize the details:
    1 inch wide Toledo blade, absence of royal cypher and regimental marking, extensive repetitive decoration to both sides of blade, a very complex monogram (which was generally accepted as FWB in agreement with F W Bevile entered in the Wilkinson proof record), scroll guard and ‘pistol’ grip with leather finger loop. The grip and finger loop are of a type adopted by some officers of the 7th Hussars.
    Excellent condition with no indication of active military or civilian use (unsharpened).
    The only FWB which has come to light is Frederick Wells Beville, a civilian physician and surgeon resident in the city of Bath, County of Somerset, with no recorded military connections.
    There remains some question as to the interpretation of the monogram. If it is accepted as FWB there remains the possibility that there was confusion on the part of Wilkinsons between the order name and that of the swords intended future owner.
    The sword has now found a home in my collection but despite the best efforts of Will and myself the original owner remains a mystery.
    We now enter the realms of wishful thinking! The pristine condition of the sword, its lack of military and royal marking and its obvious design as a fighting cavalry weapon might suggest that the sword was ordered by F W Beville on behalf of a serving officer in the Indian Army (hence scroll guard) to be used only for ceremonial purposes.
    Lieutenant Colonel Francis Granville Beville CIE fits the bill perfectly.
    Indian Staff Corps; Promoted Major 1904 and Lt. Colonel 1912; Civilian occupation from 1895 whilst retaining military rank; Permanent Civil Employ from 1900; Political Agent Central India from 1909; Delhi Durbar 1911 (sword proof date 1910); official visits to Indian States 1920; retired Lt. Col. 1922 and returned to Bicknoller, Somerset where he died the following year (about 40 miles from BATH).
    Frederick Wells Beville was in residence at Bath in 1911 and remained there until his death in 1944. Unfortunately I have been unable to establish a family connection with FGB. The sword came through auction in the neighbouring county of Dorset. The proximity of Bicknoller, Bath and Dorset may of course be coincidental.
    This sword and that of Joe Laycock are referred to in my article published by the Royal Armouries, Leeds, an updated version of which is available using the link below.
    https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/T...4.2021.1886746
    The Laycock sword has since joined my collection and minor changes to the article will be required.

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