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Thread: US sword Weyersberg Brothers...

  1. #1

    US sword Weyersberg Brothers...

    I snagged this sword from an online auction. The pics posted weren’t all that good but I could see the American eagle on the blade and the steel mounted piece looked to be reasonably sound so I threw a bid at it and wound up winning it. The sword came yesterday and I was surprised to see that the scabbard and fittings were brass rather than the steel I expected. It turns out to have been made by Weyersberg Brothers , Solingen. The “Iron Proof” blade’s etched with the usual martial motifs including the previously mentioned eagle as well as a star spangled shield. The only odd thing about the etch is a skull and crossbones logo. Never saw that on an American blade before. I’m guessing the sword is pre or Civil War period. Here are some pics.

    Len

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    Last edited by Len Scibilia; 04-28-2021 at 05:29 AM.

  2. #2
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    What a neat sword. This sword is very similar to the one used by the US Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company as can be seen by a search here. There is also an example that is a South American export sword although this is clearly a US sword.

    Nice find Len.
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    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  3. #3
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    And Len's sword is a very near relative to my Brazilian sabre, which has essentially the same hilt furniture, but with leather grip wrap and a pipe-back blade.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Wheeler View Post
    What a neat sword. This sword is very similar to the one used by the US Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company as can be seen by a search here. There is also an example that is a South American export sword although this is clearly a US sword.

    Nice find Len.
    Well done! The Honorable Artillery Company was my first guess also, based on the scrolled counterguard. But the death head, metal scabbard...maybe a CW cavalry officer's sword? Could still be the AHAC sword. It's a good idea to inquire with their Boston museum. http://www.ahac.us.com/include/museum.php
    If my memory serves me right, this hilt is in Peterson's book.

  5. #5
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    The skull and cross bones are quite masonic Scottish Rite as well. I could see a private purchase commission. Some years ago I came across a sabre that I thought unique for years until another twin showed up with a different named etched. Here is the first one and of course I hid the other one someplace safe I am not remembering. Truly two identical examples with two different names.

    Cheers
    GC
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  6. #6
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    Here we go. One of these years I will get some filing work done. This one filed in 2014, the other one 2008.

    It is also possible the sword might have been an officer of the AHAC. The "ordinary" ones are in a post war Ames catalog and we know from other discussions there were later patterns. There is the armoury plate and other images in my files.

    Cheers
    GC
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Cain View Post
    And Len's sword is a very near relative to my Brazilian sabre, which has essentially the same hilt furniture, but with leather grip wrap and a pipe-back blade.
    What makes it a Brazilian sabre?

  8. #8

    Lightbulb

    Thanks very much for your comments and great pics fellas!! It sure looks like it might be for a well heeled member of the AHAC who might have also been a mason or perhaps a Yale alumni member of the Skull and Bones society. I noticed that the eagle is facing the arrows rather than the olive branches. Does this denote it’s manufacture during a time of armed conflict? Are George and Mark’s swords marked to the brothers Weyersberg?

    Len
    Last edited by Len Scibilia; 04-30-2021 at 07:16 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry Z~G View Post
    What makes it a Brazilian sabre?
    The blade etching shows the old Brazilian coat of arms and the cypher of Dom Pedro II.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Cain View Post
    The blade etching shows the old Brazilian coat of arms and the cypher of Dom Pedro II.
    Thank you. A nice sword. Was this a regulation pattern?

  11. #11
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    It's difficult to say. I have yet to find any documents that define what was regulation for Brazilian army officers in the middle of the 19th century. It may be that Brazil's regulation patterns were not codified until later in the century. Sadly, the sword is unmarked but for the etching.

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