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Thread: Bavarian Rumford Saber

  1. #1
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    Bavarian Rumford Saber

    Guys: I found this today in my pile of accumulated swords, a Bavarian Rumford. Marked for the 2nd Train Bn., with the 6th Cheavauleger marking cancelled. I do not know why, but this model, as an actual issue weapon, is very hard to find here in the US. I have found more Saxon and other states than the Bavarian examples.

    Of course the private purchase models are easily found around here, but I like the issued weapons and this is the only one I have ever owned.

    According to the Prussian/German regulations, the Bavarians were supposed to adopt the KD 89 in 1890, but they loved their Rumford Sabers a lot!!

    Dale
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  2. #2
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    Guys: Note the lower ring was removed or never installed, in 1895-96, the Germans changed the mounting of sabers for the French/British one ring in a carrier on the saddle style. In 1904, they ordered the scabbards blackened, this applied to all mounted units, except Infantry Officers, who finally changed to one ring in 1908.

    Dale

  3. #3
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    Washers

    Gentlemen; I made a washer for this one as well. I have a supply of ancient dried up rifle slings that are useful for this purpose. It takes several applications of Ballistol to darken them, but is is worth the effort.

    Dale
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  4. #4
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    Dale, are you installing them without disassembly of the sword?
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
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  5. #5
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    I can see why they liked their Rumford swords. The leather washer looks authentic. I find cutting the 90║ edges a bit challenging as not to cut past the corner.
    I see you also cut the opening to be snug on installation so they are a friction fit.

  6. #6
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    Yes, very tight. No need to disassemble the saber. By this time, the Germans were using a easily replaced friction fitted washer. A hole punch was used at the top and bottom of the slot, just short of the limit. It makes it easier to cut the opening that way. Easier to cut the contours.

    Dale

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the tip Dale, it seems I was doing things the hard way. I was cutting the length on either side then using a small Xacto blade for the thickness of the blade.
    I have plenty of hole punches in my tool box!

  8. #8
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    What a great idea, using old rifle sling leather!! When I remade a few leather washers, I used a paperclip formed around the ricasso to make my template for exact blade fit. I used to work in a hospital and I had scalpel handles and nice pile of blades. They did a cleaner cut than any X-acto knife I ever used. On another note, Will has been kind enough to give me his input on the swords I acquired but I'm still researching the Rumford blade I picked up. The blade is 29-1/4", 1-1/4" at the ricasso, and just over a 1/4" thick where it meets the guard. The fuller runs right up into the guard and there's just a tiny (1/8") ricasso where the edge meets the guard. Unlike yours, you'll note the guard is brass. There are no unit/makers marks that I can find and the scabbard is leather covered wood with brass fittings and a frog stud. The sword weighs in at 1 lb. 5 oz. As you can see, there's just a few traces of the original engraving left and the blade shows clear evidence of service sharpening. Even after all these years, I wouldn't want to take a hit from it. Any thoughts?
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  9. #9
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    Lawrence I wonder if the sword could be naval? Blade length and brass hilt suggest it may be. Could also be an infantry sidearm?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    Lawrence I wonder if the sword could be naval? Blade length and brass hilt suggest it may be. Could also be an infantry sidearm?
    That's exactly the kind of information I'm attempting to nail down. I paid the nominal fee to Mark Cloke to join his archive and I'm hoping that he, or one the other members, will be able to give some definitive information. I hadn't considered the possibility that it could be naval, but then I know absolutely nothing about continental swords of this period, which units used them, and I hadn't even heard the term Rumford until I bought these. Research can be equal parts fascination and frustration.

  11. #11
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    That kind of blade was retailed by somebody in Solingen called Halbach already in 1775, so I find dubious the attribution to Count Rumford, that was 22 at the time. Halbach was selling montmorencys as well. A sales pitch was sent to the Spanish king that year, with real size cardboard copies of the blades, and possible etchings. It was found at the castle of Simancas royal archives by Godoy and published in the 1970s in a journal devoted to Royal Palaces. I have seen some of the proposed etching types in existing swords. Viva el rey de Espa˝a and so on.
    Last edited by Javier Ramos; 05-31-2021 at 07:22 AM.
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio foršoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el brašo, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  12. #12
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    Out of curiosity, would this monogram on the 1822/99 Chatellerault sabre belong to the owner?
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  13. #13
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    Yes, the owner. An officer, so might be possible to find him in the French army lists providing you can decipher the monogram.

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